Injuries: road traffic injuries

The Transport Scotland publication Reported Road Casualties Scotland 2015 presents statistics about the circumstances of personal injury due to road accidents in Scotland that were reported by the police using the Stats 19 statistical returns. Each accident is classified according to the severity of the injury of the most seriously injured person involved in the accident. Injury accidents not reported by the public to the police do not appear in these statistics. Details of all road accidents and casualties by severity  for years 1938 to 2015 are available in Table 2.

Key points:

  • In 2015, there were 157 fatal accidents, 24 (13%) less than in 2014.
  • Serious injury accidents between 2014 and 2015 decreased by 74 (5%) to 1,417.
  • Slight injury accidents fell by 270 (4%) between 2014 and 2015 to 6,900.
  • There were 168 people killed in road accidents in Scotland in 2015, 35 (17%) less than in 2014.
  • 1,596 people were seriously injured in road accidents in 2015, 108 (6%) less than in 2014.
  • 9,204 people were slightly injured in road accidents in 2015, 196 (2%) fewer than in 2014.
  • There were a total number of 10,968 casualties in 2015 – 339 (3%) fewer than in 2014.
  • Time series for casualties by severity are presented in the chart (view chart).
  • A total of 6,712 car users were injured in road accidents in 2015, representing 61% of all casualties. Of these car users, 75 died. The number of car users killed in 2015 was 20% less than the 2014 figure. The number who were seriously injured fell by 7% and the total number of casualties of all severities was down by 1%.

  • Adult car user casualties varied by month, with fewest in April and most in November. Friday had the peak numbers of adult car user casualties over the years 2011-2015 with 12% more than the average daily number of adult car user casualties (Table 28, Table 29 and Table 30). 

  • August was the peak month for child casualties, with 24% more than in an average month (Table 29). 

  • There were 1,694 pedestrian casualties (15% of the total), of whom 44 died, 794 pedal cycle casualties (7% of the total), of whom 5 died, and 734 motorcycle casualties (7% of the total), of whom 27 died. 

  • In 2015, Scotland's casualty rates per head of population were 15% higher (killed), 16% lower (serious) and 33% lower (all severities) than in England & Wales (Tables C to F).

The ISD publication Unintentional Injuries [547Kb] includes information about number of emergency admissions to acute hospitals in Scotland (until 31 March 2015), as a result of a road traffic accidents, for adults and children.

Key points:

  • In 2014/15 2,540 adults aged 17 years and over were emergency admitted to hospital as a result of a road traffic accident; the average length of hospital stay per episode was 3.5 days. (Table 10 [61Kb)]
  • 41% of adult emergency hospital admissions as a result of a road traffic accident were due to injuries obtained while in a car.  (Table 10 [61Kb)]
  • In 2014/15 375 children under 17 years of age were emergency admitted to hospital as a result of a road traffic accident; the average length of hospital stay per episode was 1.5 days. (Table 10 [61Kb)]

  • 40% of emergency hospital admissions as a result of a road traffic accident in children were due to pedestrian injury, while 30% were pedal cyclist injuries. (Table 10 [61Kb)]

  • Taking into account the age and sex breakdown of the population, there were more emergency admissions to hospital as a result of a road traffic accident in children aged under 15 in deprived areas than less deprived areas (the standardised discharge ratio was 48% higher in the most deprived area and 35% lower in the least deprived area compared to the Scottish average). (Table 9 [132Kb])

      

Please note: If you require the most up-to-date data available, please check the data sources directly as new data may have been published since these data pages were last updated. Although we endeavour to ensure that the data pages are kept up-to-date, there may be a time lag between new data being published and the relevant ScotPHO web pages being updated.